Prep & Application

CREATING ACCURATE PAINT FORMULATIONS to achieve authentic colours used by early American craftsmen requires skill and pains taking care. OLD VILLAGE paint craftsmen create authentic colours that simply cannot be matched by a mass production process, or by mixing tints and bases in a store. OLD VILLAGE paints are of superb quality, using natural earth pigments from around the world, as well as the heartland of America. These fine materials are then crafted by masters of 18th and 19th Century colour fidelity. . .fifth-generation paintmakers, the OLD VILLAGE historical paint craftsmen.

OLD VILLAGE paints offer to the architect, decorator, and home owner a series of authentic colours representative of those used in early America. They are formulated for use either inside or outside, over a great variety of substrates. Hiding level, durability, and application properties of OLD VILLAGE Paints are of the highest order. This however, does not imply that sound painting practices can be ignored.

The OLD VILLAGE paint collection is an ever growing colour library and is available for specific applications. OLD VILLAGE paints capture the charm and character of Colonial, Federal and Victorian periods. Perfect for furniture, walls, decorative accents, interior and exterior woodwork. Easy to use. Soft-sheen velvety finish. OLD VILLAGE Paints are available in your choice of latex, oil- base, buttermilk formulations…or paste stains.

In the application of OLD VILLAGE paints it must be recognized that the effect to be achieved is the setting of a more gracious age. Colonial craftsmen spent long years of apprenticeship at their trade and reached a refinement of skills seldom encountered in our age. They were unconcerned with modern production methods and relatively unhampered by the press of time and economics. As a result, the quality of their work is difficult to equal even with our technological advancements in application techniques and product formulation. It is important, then, to give to the colour decorating task all the skill and painstaking care possible, commensurate with practicability.

Preparation

Of prime importance and first consideration in the application of any paint system and especially of a colour coat, must be surface preparation. This consideration includes not only the immediate substrate upon which the colour is to be applied, but also the environment in which it is to be used. It is the job of the applicator to see that no foreign material prevents continuous contact of the applied paint film to the surface to which it is applied. The surface to be painted must be sound, clean and dry. Imperfections such as rotted areas on wood, rusted metal, loose plaster, loose or crumbling masonry, efflorescence, cracked or peeling paint, must be removed, repaired or replaced.

The surface must then be cleaned of any dirt, grease, wax, loose paint, detergent film, soap, rust, corrosion, chalk, and stains. (Oil soluble dyestuffs are virtually impossible to remove and may be sealed with a shellac type stain seal.) It is important that the applicator be his own critic. Conditions and contaminants other than those mentioned may exist. If they do, means must be improvised to bring the surface to a paintable condition. Having prepared the surface, it is next essential that the area be inspected for construction defects, material deterioration, proper caulking, glazing, etc.

The whole environment should be brought to a condition that will prevent any subsequent change that may render the applied paint system ineffectual.

The actual application of OLD VILLAGE paints may be accomplished by either brush, roller or spray. For brush or roller applications the paint should be used as supplied. Spray application can be accommodated by thinning the paint at a ratio of approximately four parts paint to one part Approved Mineral Spirits.

Old Village Paints


Application Specifications For New Work

USING OLD VILLAGE PAINT COLOURS

On new work a two coat system is recommended except on those surfaces where the texture of the substrate is to be retained. Certain surfaces require special priming for best results. These surfaces are indicated in the following specifications.

MASONRY – PLASTER
DRYWALL CONSTRUCTION
(CONCRETE, STUCCO, BRICK, ETC.)

For Interior Application: Use one coat PVA primer sealer. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint.
For Exterior Application: Use one coat cement & stucco primer. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint.

WOOD – TRIM FURNITURE, CABINETS, ETC.

For Interior Application: Use One coat OLD VILLAGE oil or water base interior Undercoater. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint.

FOR EXTERIOR APPLICATION: Use One coat OLD VILLAGE oil or water base exterior Primer. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint.

METAL -ALUMINUM,
OTHER NONFERROUS METALS,
GALVANIZED IRON & STEEL
Note: Allow Galvanized Iron & Steel to Weather One Year

Interior & Exterior Application: Use one coat OLD VILLAGE MetalPrimer #1281. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil Base Paint.

METAL – IRON & STEEL

Interior & Exterior Application: Use OLD VILLAGE Metal Primer #1254. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil Paint.


Application Specifications for Repainting

USING OLD VILLAGE PAINT COLOURS

For repaint work on a sound, well prepared surface adequate hiding can usually be achieved in one coat. However, exterior exposures and areas of excessive wear will require two coats for optimum durability.

MASONRY- PLASTER
DRY WALL CONSTRUCTION
(CONCRETE, STUCCO, BRICK, ETC.)

For Interior Application: Use one or two coats of OLD VILLAGE oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint.
For Exterior Application: Use one coat cement & stucco primer. Then one coat OLD VILLAGE Oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint.

WOOD – TRIM
FURNITURE, CABINETS, ETC.

Interior & Exterior Application: Use One coat OLD VILLAGE Oil or Acrylic Water Base Paint. A pint of OLD VILLAGE covers a bureau and two chairs, a quart will do a bed, bureau and four chairs, and a gallon covers an average kitchen.

Figure about forty to fifty square feet per pint, ninety square feet per quart and four hundred square feet per gallon.


The Proper Way to paint a Raised Panel Door